5 Things We Learned from the Masters

So Augusta is over for another year and as usual, there were plenty of talking points. Here are the top five things I took home from this years event, in no particular order.

Augusta National is a Hard Course!

Every year around Masters time, a couple of posts will appear on the various internet forums. These vary slightly but boil down to what an ‘average’ golfer’ would score round Augusta in Sunday tournament conditions. Opinions will differ wildly, probably until someone compares someone else to Hitler, then the thread gets closed down, but I have yet to see the definitive answer because, well obviously enough, there isn’t one.

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Pinhawk Single Length Irons-The Complete Review: 5 years later!

single length distances

EDIT: This review has been up here for something approaching three years now and hopefully has helped a lot of golfers decide if single length irons are a good fit for them. It seems like a good time to give you my latest thoughts on Pinhawk single length (yes, and dual length;) ) irons and have a look at what has changed over the last couple of years.

EDIT 2: So we are in 2021 and single length irons are still with us, as are the pinhawks. They (single length) certainly haven’t taken over the golf market as some predicted, but they remain an interesting option for a lot of golfers. Over the last few years, I have played with 2 sets of pinhawk irons, a set of cobra forged single length and the Wishon Sterling irons.

Before somebody asks why I don’t still have my first set of pinhawks in the bag, it is simply because that isn’t why I play golf. I like trying equipment, trying new (and vintage) clubs and testing different things.

If my aim was simply to find a set that makes the game easier, the pinhawks would still be well up there on my shortlist. And if price was a major factor in my choice (and I didn’t need to have mizuno/ping/taylormade etc on my clubs) the pinhawk single length irons would fit the bill very well. This is as true for the single digit handicapper I am today as the teen I was a few years ago and the 20/30 etc a few years before that.

There is one other big difference today in the single length market however, and that is the number of reasonably-priced alternatives to get you started. Without saying all one-length irons are the same, this might be my bottom line advice as we head towards 2022:

Choose one of the more reasonably-priced single length sets in about the right flex and just try them for a dozen rounds. It really is the best way of deciding if one length irons are going to be the right fit for you

If you aren’t sure which set, don’t worry too much. Resale on same-length clubs tends to be good and you shouldn’t lose too much if you do decide that they aren’t for you. Here are couple of options on Amazon for example, at two different price points:

Ok, so perhaps the best place to start is the TL:DR version: These are still great irons at a great price and everything I say in the article about them holds true. I have used them a lot in the last few years and they do exactly what they say on the tin-make for a simple, consistent set up and swing. In fact, I recently gave one of my sets to a 22 handicapper who told my how easy he found them to be and that he was having a lot of fun with them. For complete transparency, he did say that he was struggling in the bunkers with the sandwedge, but firstly, he is a 22 handicapper and secondly I personally don’t like the set sandwedge in the bunkers either (something about the weight/sole design I think) but do love it as an ’11 (or 12?) iron.

So what’s new? Perhaps the biggest change has been the introduction of single length hybrids. This is a real game changer simply because a lot of golfers aren’t going to get a single length 4 or 5 iron (maybe even a 6) high enough to do what it needs to do. The possibility of blending hybrids and irons all with the same specs is really good and will work well for so many golfers.

There are also single length woods now in the pinhawk range. I haven’t tried these yet and really they aren’t on my radar currently. Do I think they will be useful? Almost certainly, but I don’t think they will be a revolution in the same way that irons/hybrids can be.

There is one more thing that has got me a bit excited, although I don’t know if it will great or perhaps not so much and this is the announcement by Value golf that they will be bringing out a dual length set (called vertex.) I don’t know a lot about this for the moment, but I am following it with interest. EDIT: you can find out more about the vertex irons here

So that’s it. I was going to redo a full review, but really, nothing has changed in terms of the way I feel about these clubs or the results I get. In short, still a quality set of single length irons at a really good price from a company I love.

As I have mentioned several times on this site, I like single length irons, both in theory and in practice. The new Cobra set and the Sterling single length are getting plenty of attention, which is great but the most affordable option (and the one I have used myself) seems to be a little more under the radar. I was fortunate enough to get my hands on a test set of the new version of the Pinhawk single length irons from Value Golf and decided to take them for a thorough workout in the simulator. The results were very interesting and should give a lot of food for thought to anyone considering single length irons.

 

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